The Icy Origins of Heart Attacks

Winter was coming and it hit hard, destroying the preserved food and even leaving the trees and bushes empty. All that was left was an animal here and there. But even this was getting rare and hunting was not as easy as before. Mankind’s difficulties were not over as soon as expected.

ice_age

The ice age was one of those points in human history that changed everything. Not getting enough vitamins resulted in people’s blood vessel walls developing tiny cracks. Eventually, bleeding started everywhere in their bodies. Scurvy, known today as the sailor’s disease, became one of the biggest threats to our distant ancestors.

When everything else fails, though, one can count on evolution. Moreover, our incredible system of body cells came up with an idea to stop the bleeding. It introduced lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) and used it to repair the cracks in the blood vessel walls. Unfortunately this led to a dangerous narrowing of the width of those walls, thus making it harder to keep the blood flowing.

Especially in the heavily used blood vessels near the heart, this led to problems. The absence of micronutrients and the pressure from the ever-pumping organ caused minute cracks in the blood vessel walls, resulting in their being repaired using Lp(a). Over time, the blood vessel walls became blocked, the blood flow stopped, and a heart attack occurred. An organic process, designed to save humanity, turned into one of its greatest threats.

Inside the artery wall weakened by vitamin deficiency the Lp(a) particle fulfills two distinct repair functions: First, the sticky protein apo(a) lines up with the defective collagen molecules to prevent further damage and blood leakage to the outside. Secondly, the LDL-part of the Lp(a) molecule is needed for another ‘repair mechanism’: it supplies cholesterol and other fats for the synthesis of new cells.
Inside the artery wall weakened by vitamin deficiency the Lp(a) particle fulfills two distinct repair functions: First, the sticky protein apo(a) lines up with the defective collagen molecules to prevent further damage and blood leakage to the outside. Secondly, the LDL-part of the Lp(a) molecule is needed for another ‘repair mechanism’: it supplies cholesterol and other fats for the synthesis of new cells.
 

The new understanding regarding the development of heart disease that you can read on this website provides both the scientific proof for the facts described above and the solution to it.

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